Bone Scan

Nuclear medicine 

What is a Bone Scan?

A Bone Scan is a nuclear imaging test that helps diagnose and track several types of bone disease including Fractures, Arthritis, Cancer, Paget’s disease, infections of the bone or impaired blood supply to the bone. Your doctor may order a bone scan if you have unexplained skeletal pain, a bone infection or a bone injury that cannot be seen on a standard X-ray.

A bone scan can also be an important tool for detecting cancer that has spread (metastasized) to the bone from the tumor’s original location, such as the breast or prostate.

Preparing For Your Bone Scan

  • You may wear your own clothing, such as jogging, leggings, or sweat pants, as long as there are no metal fasteners, zippers, buttons, etc. Hospital gowns are available.
  • Jewelry and other accessories should be left at home, if possible, or removed prior to the scan.

Walk-in Patients: Please be sure to bring the signed order from your physician requesting the examination and your insurance card.

What You Can Expect During Your Bone Scan

The Nuclear Medicine equipment used for your scan is performed in an open environment which alleviates discomfort or claustrophobia concerns, as the patient is not fully enclosed.

A bone scan procedure includes both an injection and the actual scan. Your technician will inject a very safe radioactive material (tracer) into a vein in your arm.

The amount of time between the injection and scan varies, depending on the reason your doctor has ordered the scan. Some images may be taken immediately after the injection, but the main images are taken two to four hours later to allow the tracer to circulate and be absorbed by your bones.

You will be asked to lie still on a table while camera passes back and forth over your body. The scan itself can take up to an hour. Your technician may recommend that you drink several glasses of water while you wait.

Your doctor might order a three-phase bone scan, which includes a series of images taken at different times. A number of images are taken as the tracer is injected, then shortly after the injection, and again three to five hours after the injection.

To better see some bones in your body, your doctor might order additional imaging called single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). This imaging can help with conditions that are especially deep in your bone or in places that are difficult to see.

After Your Bone Scan

In most cases, you can go about your day after your scan. The small amount of radioactive tracer will lose its reactivity or pass through your urine and stool over the next day or two. Drink plenty of water to help flush it out of your system.

How Soon Will Scan Results Be Available?

Your images are reviewed, and results interpreted by one of our qualified doctors who specializes in reading images (radiologist). The Radiologist will prepare a report, which is electronically sent to your doctor as soon as available, usually within 24-48 hours

Book Your Appointment with AngelCare Today

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(713) 955-2142
Fax: (817) 476-8554

visit

17490 Highway 3, Suite B400
Webster, TX 77598

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AngelCare

17490 Hwy 3, Suite B400
Webster, TX 77598

713-955-2142
support@angelcareimaging.com

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